Episode 18: Managing Employee Stress

Whether stemming from work issues or their personal lives, most employees will experience stress at some point in time, and the impact can be detrimental to the organization. In this episode of Health Advocate’s Ask the Expert series, Matt Verdecchia, a senior trainer with Health Advocate’s EAP+Work/Life program, shares how employers can take steps to more effectively understand and manage employee stress at work.

By Michael Kaplan | New York Post

When Larry Nolan decided to fix his deviated septum — so askew that his nose was visibly crooked and airflow was almost nonexistent — he knew he needed to find a skilled plastic surgeon. He also knew he wouldn’t be paying retail.

The 34-year-old Californian, who co-owns the Hardcore Fitness chain of gyms, sought a price quote from the office of Dr. Robert Kotler, a highly regarded facial plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills. The initial estimate: $16,500. Nolan suspected he could negotiate a better deal.

More people than ever are haggling to reduce the cost of health care, spanning everything from annual physicals to major lifesaving surgery. And for good reason: A poll, co-conducted last year by the find-a-doctor site Amino.com, found that 55 percent of respondents had been hit with at least one medical bill they couldn’t afford to pay.

Abbie Leibowitz, founder and chief medical officer of Health Advocate Solutions, a company that advises consumers on health care and insurance needs, explains that out-of-pocket expenses are rising. Average deductibles for family plans came to $8,232 in 2017, according to eHealth Insurance. As a result, patients are devising creative ways to save cash. “If you are not attempting to negotiate, you are missing out,” Leibowitz says.

It helps to have a bargaining chip, experts tell The Post. Common points of negotiation include flexibility in scheduling, the ability to satisfy a bill quickly and — depending on your digital clout — a promise to promote the provider on social media. An expression of need can sometimes help, too.

Nolan negotiated a break by accepting a last-minute appointment when another patient canceled, agreeing to go under the knife with just five days’ notice. When the office manager asked what he’d be willing to pay for the spur-of-the-moment surgery, he said $12,000.

“They said they could do it at that price,” Nolan says — a savings of more than 25 percent.

For his part, Kotler tells The Post that he also considers markdowns for patients who sign on for multiple procedures at the same time or piggyback with another patient for what he calls “the friends and family plan.”

“If someone and her sister want work done and we can do it all in the same day, we offer a discount that can be 20 percent,” Kotler says.

Wheeling and dealing also works for dentistry. When Nolan needed crowns on his four front teeth, he scored a 50-percent-off deal in which he agreed to promote the dentist to the 150,000 Instagram followers and 5,000 Facebook friends he shares with his wife. “By posting pictures of me smiling on Instagram and tagging the dentist on Facebook, I brought the price down to around $4,000,” Nolan says. “And [the dentist] posted before-and-after pictures of me on her Facebook page.” Nolan estimates that his endorsements drove at least 20 new patients to the practice.

Ed Brodow, author of “Negotiation Boot Camp” and a negotiation consultant to Fortune 500 companies, says courage is half the battle. “It’s all about having the guts to ask,” he says.

Such was the case when he received a $2,000 quote for a dental crown. “I flinched and said, ‘That seems very high. I can’t afford that. Can you help me out?’ ” The dentist lopped 25 percent off the price.

“I knew he would rather get $1,600 from me than have me not do it or look for another dentist,” Brodow says.

Researching market rates can further empower patients in price discussions, says Derek Fitteron, CEO of Medical Cost Advocate, which aids clients in getting value out of health care. He suggests looking up average procedure costs on sites such as Medicare.gov and HealthcareBluebook.com and using those numbers as a starting point.

And don’t hesitate to negotiate if your bill doesn’t align with typical fees. “Call [the provider] and say, ‘You are charging me more than the going rate,’” Fitteron says. Doctors’ offices often acquiesce in hopes of securing payment more quickly, he notes.

In many cases, haggling after care actually gives you an edge. “That’s when you are in a position of power,” says Diane Mullins, a registered nurse with an MBA in health care management and the author of “Health Care & You: A Guide to Navigating the Health Care System and Becoming Your Own Best Advocate.” After all, the hospital can’t exactly take back your artificial hip.

Another gambit for getting a price cut after the fact: Offering to pay a smaller lump sum immediately as opposed to a larger amount in billed installments. This often results in a 15 to 20 percent discount, Fitteron says.

It can work even when your bill isn’t in the thousands. Leibowitz says that patients can haggle over co-pays, offering to pay a smaller amount on the day of their office visit. “You can offer to pay $20 on the spot rather than them billing you for $30,” he says. “The idea of getting paid right then and there is appealing [to doctor’s offices].”

As an entrepreneur himself, Nolan believes that health care is a numbers game like everything else. “Because doctors provide a medical service, people think that their prices are set in stone,” says Nolan. “But ultimately, they are also running businesses. And like all [businesspeople], they benefit from negotiating.”

Dr. Raffi Terzian | BenefitsPRO

As health care continues to grow increasingly complex, the repercussions can be especially apparent during open enrollment season. Whether organizations are changing their plans, adding new offerings or switching their approach, open enrollment can often best be described as controlled chaos for those leading the charge.

With this year’s open enrollment just around the corner for most organizations, now is the time to think ahead. Brokers and consultants can play an integral role in reducing the burden for their clients by helping them stay abreast of both ongoing and emerging trends and issues facing HR professionals. Here are nine trends and common issues to be aware of:

  1. HDHPs – The continued adoption of high-deductible and other consumer-driven health plans are driving employees to look for options that make the most of their health care dollars. Helping employees understand their options and how their choice may impact costs can help avoid issues later on.
  2. Plan changes – Between policy updates, mergers and cost shifts, the plans available to employees frequently change. This can adjust their level of coverage, premiums and cost-sharing responsibility, and provider network, making it critical that they have resources to help determine the best fit for their needs.
  3. Prescription coverage changes – As part of other plan modifications or new offerings, yearly changes to prescription coverage can also have a big impact on employees (especially those on long-term medication for chronic conditions, etc.), so it’s even more important to communicate these changes effectively to avoid issues down the road.
  4. Diverse workforce – Employees represent a span of generations, lifestyles and backgrounds, so one size plan does not fit all. It’s important that open enrollment options provide for this variety of needs.
  5. Digital options – From online platforms that help employees select plans to plan offerings like telemedicine, digital technology is playing a growing role in open enrollment as well as benefits in general.
  6. Multi-channel outreach – In addition to utilizing technology, many employers are looking to diversify their benefits communication in order to reach more employees in the ways they seek information. This can include mailers, posters, emails, small meetings, and much more.
  7. Concierge services – Due to the increasing confusion of open enrollment, more and more organizations are offering resources and services to help employees navigate the complexities. This can help reduce the burden on HR as well as ensure employees make more informed decisions.
  8. Addons – Many employees have a wide variety of additional options to consider adding during open enrollment, which may lead to confusion about what is best for each individual and their family. Effectively explaining these options, their costs and their benefits can make a big difference.
  9. Overworked HR team – As benefits continue get more complex, HR teams field an increasing number of questions and concerns from employees, especially during open enrollment.

Addressing some of these key challenges or issues in advance can help make this year’s open enrollment process smooth and successful. Open enrollment may be challenging, but working together with clients to plan ahead can enable organizations to overcome issues, leading to a more effective benefits year ahead.

Dr. Terzian is a board certified Emergency Physician with nearly 20 years of clinical and administrative experience. Before joining Health Advocate, Dr. Terzian led educational programs at a number of the country’s top teaching hospitals.

Episode 17: Addressing Opioid Misuse and Abuse in the Workplace

The inappropriate use of opiodis is a fast-growing public health issue nationwide, and the impact is also being felt in the workplace. In this episode of Health Advocate’s Ask the Expert series, we’re joined by Dr. Raffi Terzian, Health Advocate’s Senior Medical Director, to discuss strategies to address prescription drug misuse and abuse in the workplace.

Here’s how to clear up inaccurate charges and get the reimbursement you’re owed

By Nellie Huang | Kiplinger

This professional can sort through your care options or sort out medical or insurance snafus.

When Richard Crestani had eye surgery three years ago, an error in the medical billing code for the operation resulted in $18,500 in bills his insurance company refused to pay. After trying to correct the error for six months with no luck, Crestani, who lives in Boca Raton, Fla., called Kenneth Klein, a local patient advocate. Klein helps clients negotiate medical bills and resolve billing errors, and he was able to convince the hospital that the medical billing code was incorrect. In the end, the insurance company paid its share, reducing the bill by nearly $15,000. “He was very tenacious and knew just who to contact,” says Crestani.

A growing number of patient advocates like Klein can help you untangle medical bills or insurance coverage snags or assist with care-related questions, such as helping you decide whether to have heart surgery in your hometown or at a specialty hospital in another state. Patient advocates, also known as care managers or patient navigators, are often doctors or nurses, or they may be former employees of insurance companies, doctor’s offices, hospitals or other care facilities. That gives them an insider’s understanding of how the system works and how best to sort out medical snafus.

How to Find One

Patient advocates help you navigate the system, but they don’t provide medical care or make treatment decisions, says Trisha Torrey, executive director of AdvoConnection Directory, a database of independent patient advocates. Rather, they help patients make informed decisions. “Patients often don’t know what questions to ask,” says Torrey. “The advocates do.”

Many Americans already have access to these services through an employee benefits program. Health Advocate Solutions, for instance, works with 11,500 large companies and institutions worldwide, offering advocacy services to 12.5 million employees and their families. “Health care is confusing and difficult for the average person to figure out,” says Abbie Leibowitz, a founder of Health Advocate Solutions. “We help people who have any problem in health care.”

If your employer doesn’t offer a benefit like this, you’ll likely have to pay out of pocket for an independent advocate. Such professionals typically charge between $75 and $450 an hour, depending on the type of service required and your location, says Torrey. Some advocates who focus solely on billing issues charge a commission on the amount of money they save you instead of an hourly rate (or, in some instances, on top of an hourly fee). Leibowitz says the average case at his firm takes roughly two hours, spread over days or weeks.

The nonprofit Patient Advocate Foundation offers its services free. “We help patients with their entire case,” says outreach director Caitlin Donovan. Although the group deals mostly with lower-income households, anyone can call for help. “It can be hard to get through on the phone lines, but keep calling,” she says. The foundation works in tandem with many other groups, too, such as cancer and diabetes organizations.

One caveat: Patient advocates aren’t licensed, credentialed or regulated in any state. A group called the Patient Advocate Certification Board is developing certification criteria and an exam, which may launch in early 2018. In the meantime, if you’re thinking about hiring an advocate, ask your primary-care doctor for a referral, says Linda Adler, a patient advocate in San Mateo, Calif. Then interview the advocate. Ask for personal references, says Leibowitz. Find out what kinds of cases the advocate is used to handling to see whether he or she has experience with cases like yours. And if the advocate tries to sell you something, Leibowitz adds, find another candidate.

James Davis | HR Daily Advisor

At the recent #SHRM2018, I attended a session entitled “Addressing Prescription Overuse in the Workplace,” given by Norbert J. Alicea, Executive Vice President with Health Advocate’s EAP+Work/Life Services, and Raffi Terzian, the Senior Vice President of Clinical Operations and Senior Medical Director at Health Advocate. Their session addressed the astounding and alarming impact that addiction has on the workplace.

Much of the session was eye-opening and deeply concerning. Perhaps one of the most powerful things that Alicea said was that “People lose their family 5 years before they lose their job, it’s the last thing to go.” Addicts on average experienced destruction because of their addiction for at least 5 years before their addiction cost them their jobs. That’s 5 years that an addict would, at the very least, be underperforming at work and, at worse, be destructive to his or her organization.

I can’t think of a better way to characterize how important it can be to address addiction in the workplace.

The Numbers

The session covered a wealth of facts and figures. Here are a few that were presented, all about 2016:

  • 116 people died every day from opioid overdose—over 42,000 a year.
  • 2,100,000 people misused prescription opioids for the first time.
  • The economic cost due to opioid misuse and overdose was $504,000,000,000 (2015).
  • The total cost for opioid addiction and overdose treatment for enrollees in large employer plans was $2,628,000,000. In 2006, it was $278,000,000, just shy of a 10-fold increase.

While opioid deaths and new opioid addictions grow every year, and while organizations lose resources and productivity, employees who are abusing drugs continue to work. The numbers above are just a tiny slice of the true impact of opioid and prescription drug use and abuse. But how do they specifically influence the individual workplace?

Alicea and Terzian explained that, according to the National Safety Council, employees who abuse drugs are 2–5 times more likely to:

  • Take unexcused absences.
  • Be late for work.
  • Quit or be fired within 1 year of employment.
  • Be involved in workplace incidents.
  • File workers’ compensation claims.

Those costs add up very quickly with just one employee struggling with substance abuse at work and even faster if there are multiple abusers.

Addiction Is a Disease

Terzian introduced the session by saying, “We have to view opioid use through the lens of addiction. It’s not a moral failing, it’s a brain disease.” Both presenters repeated this statement many times because it’s that important. Alicea elaborated, “I’ve never run into the person who wants to be an addict in 25 years.”

The image of a hooded figure slumped in an alleyway with a needle in his or her arm does not represent the clear majority of prescription drug abusers. Most are now, or were, like everyday people, with families, lives, and careers. The difference? They have a powerful addiction, and without help, they will succumb to it.

The Red Flags of Addiction

If employers are to help, they need to be able to identify the warning signs of a drug abuser. Alicea exclaimed, “I’d bet every person in this room, in this conference, across the states, knows someone with a substance abuse problem. We all know at least one person. But if I asked that question, we won’t see a lot of hands go up. That’s the power of denial.” The presenters also mentioned that drug abusers’ fellow employees know about substance abuse problems long before the employers do. How? Because the warning signs are visible to those who know them best.

The more of the following red flags that an employee exhibits, the “greater the probability of an issue,” said Alicea.

Monday and Friday absenteeism—Users who have kept it together for the workweek might be hurting to use their drug of choice unimpeded or be spent from using over the weekend.

Absenteeism the day after payday—These habits are expensive. Payday might be the only time a user can afford to purchase his or her drugs.

General tardiness and/or absenteeism—Especially opioids can drain users of energy and make it difficult for them to come to work on time, or at all.

Poor quality of work and/or poor quantity of work—If a user can’t use at work, he or she might be experiencing the beginning of withdrawal. If he or she can use at work, the effects of the drugs have an equally distracting effect. Either way, his or her work will be affected.

Theft—The power of addiction leads many to make choices that you or I would never consider, especially if they are struggling to pay for their habit. Stealing equipment and other goods and money from work can help fund their addiction.

If drug abusers’ fellow workers know about their cohorts’ drug problems, “they are looking to see what HR or a manager is doing about this problem,” says Alicea. By not addressing the problem, what message is the company sending to its drug-abusing employees, never mind its loyal and clean employees?

Drug Abusers Know Where to Apply

Alicea said, “people who use drugs and alcohol know exactly where to go and apply for a job. They know.” What does that mean for employers that don’t drug-test new employees? It means a high probability that the workplace will experience continuous problems from drug-abusing employees. After the session, I asked Alicea and Terzian about that phenomena. They related to me a few examples of organizations that, for various reasons, wanted to avoid preemployment drug tests. “And they wonder why they constantly have problems,” said Alicea.

What Can You Do?

Once an employer realizes that employees who abuse opioids and other prescription and illegal drugs need help, it can begin to find a way to administer that help.

“A lot of companies had zero-tolerance policies. A lot of them are doing away with it, and I’m all in favor of a second chance,” said Alicea. He explained, “If you have an employee who worked for you for 10 years and they are relatively good, and they end up testing positive, and you terminate them—you don’t know if the new person has a problem, too, and you lose all of that knowledge.”

Alicea said the best way to help is to offer employees a one-time chance to get clean through a program (and prove it after the program is over) or be fired. Work, he said, represents a critical part of many people’s identity. Remember, by the time they are potentially losing their jobs, many drug abusers have already pushed their friends and family out of their lives. Their work identity might be all they have left. And that can be a powerful motivator, says Alicea. That makes them decent candidates for rehabilitation.=

Alicea said, “by threatening the job, the core values of a person, that person has a high probability of success in making the change provided that it’s monitored.” He focused heavily on the value of monitoring and reinforced it when we talked after the session. He said, “the success rate in treatment today is really, really low. But if you have someone monitoring that person for 90-120 days after the treatment, the rate is really, really high.” The reason is that they know that if they don’t follow through with aftercare, they will lose their job—their core personality—and that’s too much.

The Takeaway

This topic is incredibly complicated; the research is far from complete; and even with treatment, drug abusers have very real challenges ahead. If you deal with substance abusers at your organization—and it’s just a matter of time before you do—it behooves you to explore how you can help those people.

Episode 16: Encouraging Proper Use of the ER

The ER can be an invaluable resource when employees face a medical emergency. However, choosing the ER when other alternatives may be a better fit can have a big impact on healthcare costs for individuals and their organizations. In this episode of Health Advocate’s Ask the Expert series, we’re joined by Amy Kinsley, a nurse and Senior Personal Health Advocate, to discuss employee use of the emergency room.

By Dave Shadovitz | HR Executive

The workplace is the perfect place for intervention, experts suggest.

Attendees at the Society for Human Resource Management’s annual conference who were in search of some disturbing numbers weren’t disappointed during a Monday morning session on the opioid crisis titled “Addressing Prescription Overuse in the Workplace.”

Below are just a sampling of figures fitting that description. They were shared by Health Advocates’ Senior Vice President of Clinical Operations Raffi Terzian and Vice President of EAP+Work/Life Services Norbert Alicea at SHRM’s gathering in Chicago this week:

  • In 2016, 11.8 million people abused prescription medication;
  • 116 people die every day from opioid-related drug overdoses;
  • More than 70 percent of employers are impacted by prescription drugs;
  • Prescription-painkiller abuse costs employers almost $42 billion due to loss of productivity; and
  • Providers wrote nearly a quarter of a million opioid prescriptions in 2013, enough for every American adult to have his or her own bottle of pills.

Employers are worried—and rightfully so. A recent study by the National Business Group on Health, a nonprofit association of more than 420 large U.S. employers, found that eight in 10 employers were concerned about the opioid crisis at work, Terzian said. Yet despite this fact, he added, only 30 percent of them reported they have restrictions in place for prescription opioids.

(NBGH issued a recommendation earlier this week that employers work with their health plans and pharmacy-benefits managers to ensure they are implementing national guidelines for prescribing opioids.)

Alicea addressed the necessity for more thorough training so managers and supervisors are better equipped to recognize the red flags. They need to be able to identify the early warning signs, such as absenteeism on Mondays and Fridays (or the day after a payday), lateness, poor quality of work, theft and morale, he said. (He also touched on this topic in a brief video recorded at the conference. See below.)

Workers, he said, often know long before HR that a person has an issue, and they’re looking to see what HR is doing or what the manager or supervisor is going to do about this troubling problem.

“I can’t even tell you how many times an HR person has called me about a problem employee who has tested positive, even though it has been going on for five years,” said Alicea, adding that the problem often has less to do with the employee and more to do with the manager or supervisor who has allowed it to continue.

“HR needs to help the managers and supervisors understand that this is a real issue and teach them how to supportively confront employees, including what to say and what not to say,” Alicea said. “That’s where HR can come in as a partner, helping them focus on identifying the early warning signals and helping them remain objective.”

HR also needs to educate them on the barriers they are likely to run into and how they may be enabling the problem to continue.

“I always tell managers and supervisors to use ‘I’ messages,” said Alicea. “When you’re speaking to an individual about work-performance issues, stay away from those blame statements that include the word ‘you.’ ‘You need help. You have an alcohol or substance-abuse problem.’ I think it’s a lot better that they take a step back and address it as, ‘We have a problem. The organization has a problem. We are concerned about your work-performance issues and, based on what we have observed in the last hour, we’re going to send you for a medical evaluation, which includes a drug and alcohol test.’ ”

Employers have a critical role to play in addressing the opioid crisis at work, Alicea said. “Think about it for a second: What’s the second or third question that you’re asked in a social situation? ‘How are you, how’s the family, how’s the job?’ Whether we love our job or hate it, we all take pride in it.”

By threatening a person’s job, he explained, you’re threatening the “core values” of that individual and therefore have a much higher probability of success.

“If you have an employee who’s worked for you for 10 years—and they’re a relatively good employee, and they end up testing positive—to terminate that employee, retrain another employee, and then go ahead and hire that [other employee who could also have a substance-abuse problem] will cost you more money in the long run than to give that person an opportunity for rehabilitation by putting them on a last-chance agreement,” Alicea said.

The workplace is “the perfect place for the intervention, better than any place else in the world,” he said.

By Marcia Otto | HR Daily Advisor

Organizations continue to focus on helping employees improve their overall well-being, which in turn can positively impact productivity and costs. The key to realizing the value of this focus is an engaged population, yet despite best intentions and large investments, many employers still face low benefits utilization.

According to a recent Health Advocate survey of HR professionals, top approaches to maximize employee engagement in benefits include ongoing communications, events and meetings, and health savings account contributions, however mobile and social media usage is increasing. Despite the growing reliance on technology-based tools, 82 percent of respondents also indicated that incorporating high-touch support services helps employees more effectively navigate their health and wellness benefits.

The survey demonstrates organizations are prioritizing and expanding their efforts to engage employees. Yet while employers continue to seek new and innovative ways to drive participation in their benefits programs, this may create new challenges.

Fragmentation Creates Confusion

To try and move the needle, employers have added an increasing array of support programs as additional benefits. Many offer valuable resources, but the resulting program mix tends to only increase the complexity of health benefits as employees strive to be more savvy healthcare consumers. While the available offerings provide a wealth of assistance, employees may be unsure where to turn for their specific issue, leading to lackluster utilization.

According to survey respondents, the biggest hurdle to engagement is that a multitude of benefits programs is often disjointed, confusing, or difficult to access and navigate. Fifty-four percent of organizations offer employees access to a series of separate benefits tools or platforms, each requiring a separate login.

Additionally, 40 percent indicated that working with multiple benefits vendors led to a lack of utilization, with another 35 percent noting technology issues. These factors contribute to challenges for benefits managers trying to address employee’s confusion and streamline the experience. To mitigate this issue, a quarter of respondents report moving toward a single integrated platform where employees can access all of their benefits in one place, making it easier for employees to take advantage of available offerings.

The Value of Integration

The “missing link” is the connective tissue that blends benefits in a meaningful way, delivering the most relevant choices to each employee according to preference and frequency.  Solving this dilemma requires an intuitive approach, “high-touch” and “high-tech” – a single, unified platform that can successfully guide employees on their journey.

With a single platform, employees can easily access all of their benefits in one place, online or via a mobile app. Nearly 60 percent of respondents said that this model presents each employee with a single point of contact that is personalized, intuitive and interactive, with another 46 percent indicating that it improves employee engagement with benefits.

Breaking it down, there are five key attributes required to ensure that an integrated engagement platform is likely to succeed:

  1. Integrated

It’s critical that the benefits platform unify data from a myriad of sources and programs. That includes benefits information, essential phone numbers, healthcare expense and chronic disease management tools, and Health Savings Account (HSA) balance management from a single mobile engagement platform, for example.

  1. Relevant

Relevancy would include the option to create a personalized “to-do” list to meet each employee’s specific needs and preferences. Reminders like “Keep up the good work and become tobacco free!” or “Schedule your diabetic eye exam” are also important. Actionable items would offer claims history, gaps-in-care analytics, personal preferences and employer-provided benefits information.

  1. Consumer-like

If it’s not easy, it won’t be used. Much like shopping online, the platform must minimize the need to “hunt” for relevant information. Well-designed platforms mimic the online consumer experience, cleverly presenting the same information in multiple appropriate places to reinforce messages without seeming redundant.

  1. Smart

Real-time information access to things such as updates on pending support requests and appointment reminders are table stakes. Plus, feedback about progress towards employee health goals and customized information based on health status must be available.

  1. Connected

This means offering an open door to access all benefits seamlessly, using the communications channel that best serves each employee. It also means a platform backed by live support available via online chat, email or phone.

An effective benefits platform must eliminate confusion and anxiety. It should be the first option for all employees, but it might not be the last. By connecting to employees through multiple communication channels, employers can increase every employee’s engagement in their health journey, regardless of tech savvy.

The Human Touch Remains Critical

While technology plays an increasingly important role in employee benefits, survey participants also signaled the importance of balancing technology with the human touch when it comes to driving engagement. Seventy-eight percent currently offer employees access to live support to help with their health and benefits, with more than 80 percent confirming that having some level of high-touch support increases engagement. Technology is valuable, but employees often prefer speaking with a real person when it comes to navigating complex healthcare issues.

As digital tools continue to gain traction in employee benefits, considering how to tie available programs together in a cohesive, holistic way is critical. An integrated approach that incorporates data analytics, a seamless experience and high-touch, expert support can increase utilization, improving the health of the workforce while managing costs for employers. When programs are connected and personalized, it is more likely that employees’ needs will be met in the way that works best for them.

In order to address these issues and create an approach that will drive engagement, it is important to find an experienced benefits partner that understands how to effectively tailor benefits programs to best meet the needs of the organization and its employees.